DC fans lose in “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice”

LAS VEGAS, NV - JUNE 09:  The Batmobile from the upcoming movie Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is displayed during the Licensing Expo 2015 at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center on June 9, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada.  (Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images)

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LAS VEGAS, NV – JUNE 09: The Batmobile from the upcoming movie “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice” is displayed during the Licensing Expo 2015 at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center on June 9, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images)

“Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice” is a movie that’s average when it should be (and needs to be) great. It suffers primarily from an overuse of CGI and a nonsensical plot and dialogue, but benefits from good acting and a fascinating visual style.

The acting has a huge range, from the great to the terrible. The real star, though, is Jeremy Irons’ Alfred, Batman’s butler and assistant. He puts Michael Caine, the last actor to play Alfred, to shame. This Alfred is intelligent, occasionally acts as Batman’s moral center, and has a biting sarcasm. Affleck’s Batman gives off a great sense of rage, while his Bruce Wayne seems subtly tortured beneath his playboy exterior. While her part is small, Gal Gadot makes the most of it; in the film’s final battle scene, Wonder Woman is by far the most interesting to watch, and shows hints of Wonder Woman’s character that really make her shine. Henry Cavill is fine as Superman, but doesn’t really stand out. Cavill plays Superman the exact same way he did in “Man of Steel.” Jesse Eisenberg’s Lex Luthor is terrible. The character was well-written but horribly miscast. Lex Luthor should be physically imposing, a dominant force in both mind and body. Eisenberg plays him with a sarcastic wit and arrogance more suited for the Riddler.

The most disappointing part of this movie is the fight between Batman and Superman. It ends in a dull way, and they never fight while both at full power. Both alternate between being significantly stronger than the other, and the whole fight consists entirely of this boring back-and-forth.

The CGI in the movie isn’t terrible, just overused. The only time it’s poorly done is in the animation of the film’s final villain (a gia.nt Kryptonian monster), Doomsday. He looks completely fake, to the point that it becomes somewhat distracting during what’s supposed to be the film’s climax.

The plot of this movie is overcomplicated and makes little sense. Characters make odd, often unnecessary comments to each other for seemingly no reason. Large portions of this film are spent setting up future DC movies. Many of these scenes will be confusing to general audiences unfamiliar with the comics and serve no purpose to the plot of “Batman v Superman.”

The most jarring thing about this movie is how different it is from the comic books it’s based off of. Batman drinks alcohol and kills over 15 people by using guns. This is the least Batman-like behavior possible, and there was absolutely no reason for the filmmakers to include this. Superman is quiet and always looks angry, instead of being the cheerful symbol of hope comic fans know him as. Doomsday looks nowhere near as threatening as his comic-book-counterpart. Really though, the character who suffered the most drastic change was Martha Kent, Superman’s mother. She explains to him in one scene that he doesn’t owe the world anything; that he can choose not to be a hero. This is the least Martha-Kent-like behavior possible. Read any Superman comic with her, and she’ll say the exact opposite. Martha Kent should firmly believe that Superman was put on Earth to do good and has a responsibility to help humanity no matter the cost, because he is the best and most powerful among them. Why this line was included is mystifying. At least Wonder Woman was relatively unchanged.

Although it might entertain general audiences, this movie will gravely disappoint comic fans. Hopefully “Suicide Squad” finally gives DC fans the movie they deserve, because this sure didn’t.